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2019 Legislative Priorities

 

Habitat at the Capitol photo gallery »

 

New LIFT Allocation (HB 5005): HB 5005 had its first hearing on April 12 in the Joint Ways and Means Subcommittee on Capital Construction. Special thanks to Karen Rockwell of Benton Habitat and Erika Kennel of Habitat Portland/Metro East who provided LIFT for Homeownership support testimony on March 25 during the Oregon Housing and Community Services budget hearing, before the Joint Ways & Means committee.

 

Oregon MID Reform (HB 3349): On March 25, the House Committee on Human Services and Housing voted 5-3 to send this bill to House Revenue with a Do Pass recommendation. HB 3349 had a very strong hearing in House Revenue on April 25. Rep. Alissa Keny-Guyer, who has worked tirelessly to promote MID reform, was featured debating with Rep. Jack Zika about HB 3349 on OPB radio’s Think Out Loud: https://www.opb.org/radio/programs/thinkoutloud/segment/mortgage-tax-deduction-womens-basketball-school-boards/

 

Healthy Homes (HB 2802): On March 25, this bill moved unanimously to Joint Ways and Means with a Do Pass recommendation. Beginning the week of May 13, we’re asking everyone to contact your representative and senator to let them know how much this bill means to you.

 

Increase the Oregon IDA (SB 790/HB 3133): Special thanks to Habitat of the Mid-Willamette Valley Homeowner John Goetz who testified in support of the IDA increase on March 14 before the Senate Housing Committee. SB 790 passed unanimously with a Do Pass recommendation to the Tax Expenditures committee by prior referral. Neighborhood Partnerships is hosting an IDA Advocacy Day on May 22. Sign up to join Neighborhood Partnerships in Salem on IDA Day »

 

Receivership Technical Fix (HB 2285): The 2285 A engrossed version clarifies that probate proceedings take precedence. This bill passed the House Floor with 57 Yes votes, 2 No votes and 1 abstention. The Senate Judiciary Committee heard this bill on May 2. Special thanks to Habitat Oregon Board Member Randy Franke and Alison McIntosh of the Oregon Housing Alliance for a successful hearing.

 

Addressing Missing Middle Housing (HB 2001): On April 8, this bill was voted unanimously out of the House Committee on Human Services and Housing as Do Pass with amendments and referred to Joint Ways and Means by prior reference.

 

Increasing the Earned Income Tax Credit (HB 3028): On April 1, HB 3028 unanimously passed out of the House Committee on Human Services and Housing with a Do Pass recommendation to Revenue by prior referral. HB 3028 had a brief hearing in May 6 in House Revenue.

 

Renters’ Protections (SB 608): Gov. Brown signed this bill into law on Feb. 28.

Vote YES for Affordable Housing

At Habitat for Humanity of Oregon, we believe that everyone deserves a decent place to live. Today, our neighbors and friends can work full-time, earn an average wage, and still not afford to rent a one-bedroom apartment in most communities across Oregon. We know we can help more Oregonians have a safe and stable place to call home.

 

This November, Oregon voters will be asked to approve Measure 102, a statewide constitutional amendment to help local communities build affordable housing.

 

The amendment would lift the current ban on the ability of local governments to work with nonprofits and local businesses to build affordable housing with bonds. This small change means local housing bond dollars can go farther, helping communities address the need for homes that people can afford. Habitat for Humanity is among a growing coalition of organizations, businesses, elected officials and community members who are taking a stand to support affordable housing.

 

The Oregon Legislature voted almost unanimously to refer this constitutional amendment to voters. The amendment is a sensible, bipartisan solution to help local communities create more affordable housing for families, seniors, veterans, and people with disabilities throughout Oregon.

 

Join us in supporting #HomesWeNeed by voting YES on Measure 102 on Nov. 6.

 

Link: Yes for Affordable Housing

Housing Stability Council approves $1.82 million in LIFT for Homeownership applications for Habitat projects

On Friday, Sept. 7, the Housing Stability Council approved Oregon Housing and Community Services staff’s recommendation to fully fund all five Habitat for Humanity applications for LIFT for Homeownership. Benton Habitat for Humanity, Newberg Habitat for Humanity, Rogue Valley Habitat for Humanity, Sisters Habitat for Humanity and Tillamook County Habitat for Humanity will leverage this investment to help build 28 new homes.

 

The five affiliates were approved alongside four additional organizations (Kor Community Land Trust, NeighborWorks Umpqua, Proud Ground and Willamette Neighborhood Housing & NEDCO) that will build a total of 84 homes across the state.

 

The Local Innovation and Fast Track (LIFT) Housing Program’s objective is to build new affordable housing for low income households, especially families. In 2015, the Oregon Legislature committed $40 million of general obligation Article XI-Q bonds to fund the LIFT program. Using this new funding source will allow Oregon Housing and Community Services and its partners to add to the supply of affordable housing, in particular, for historically underserved communities. In 2017, the Oregon Legislature committed $80 million of general obligation Article XI-Q bonds to fund the LIFT program in 2018 and 2019.

 

The primary goals of the LIFT program are: 1. Create a large number of new affordable housing units to serve low income Oregonian families. 2. Serve historically underserved communities, including rural communities and communities of color.

 

To learn more about the program, click here to see the framework.

 

The next opportunity apply for LIFT for Homeownership will be in November of 2018. Please contact Grant & Loan Manager Andrew Cook today if you are interested in submitting an application. OHCS will have $10.42 million available for LIFT for Homeownership, with $6.11 million for closing the minority homeownership gap and $4.31 million for rural applications.